✨🌹NATURES RELAXATION🌹✨

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✨❤️💛💚🇯🇲🎈🎼HAPPY EARTH & SPIRITUAL-STRONG ROBERT (BOB) NESTA MARLEY 2/6/1945 ~ 5/11/1981🎼🎈🇯🇲❤️💛💚

                                           🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁

“Always Luvin’ Di Bob!”❤️💛💚

Growing up, Bob Marley’s music wasn’t always being played in my Jamaican home. My Mom, would play a song or two if I was lucky. But Bob wasn’t accepted as some may think. Not at first.

As a child, being a “Rasta” (Rastafarian) was not smiled upon. Many in my parents time, saw Rasta’s as scoundrels, lazy, nasty, worthless, thieves, and good for nothing’s. The worst thing a boy could be was a Rasta. The most unacceptable thing was for a girl to date or be with one. Every culture had/has its “Black Sheep’s” or “Cast-Off’s.” My Mother HATES Rasta. However, before she transcended she saw the side in which I viewed Bob Marley. Out of Love, Honor & Respect for me & the positivity of what Bob represented? My Mom had me loc her hair before she transcended. Blessed❤️💛💚

But as a child, I had to sneak and record Bob’s songs on my cassette recorder & Walkman (okay young people, this before your digital era😂). I learned the words to his songs & sung them ALWAYS. He became my Mentor & his songs my Mantra. His words made such dynamic sense to me, that when listening to him, I’d literally become mesmerized, as my young self meditated & swayed to do riddim. He transcended May 11th, 1981. I was 10 years old. My eldest daughter would be born on that day, 9 years later.

I will admit, I am not necessarily a Rasta. As I do not follow Rastafarianism. I have some Rasta-like ways, mentality, and or beliefs. I grew my own locks for 18 years, reaching my buttocks. I cut them for a 2nd time, as I’m on my own Spiritual journey. However, as many Jamaicans know, “Rasta ah nuh bout yuh hair. Rasta inna ya heart. Rasta inna yuh mine. Rasta inna yuh Soul. Ah serious ting dat!” Who knows, if the Bible can talk about The Prodigal Son, then I can possibly be The Prodigal Rasta Queen. Lol, it can happen 🥰 But Bob made me see the meaning of life…LOVE.

During my life, proudly and with great love, honor & respect I still listen to Bob on a regular basis. He’s deeply rooted within my existence. His songs opened my Mind, Heart, Body & Soul. It is a continuous gift & blessing.

“One Love, One Heart. Let’s Get Together & Feel Alright.”

🦁Jah! Rastarfari. Conquering Lion Of The Tribe Of Judah🦁❤️💛💚

🎈🎈🎈Respect, Guidance, Everlasting Love & Liveity! Happiest Of Existence, Earth & Spiritual-Strong🎈🎈🎈

Blessed, ROBERT NESTA MARLEY❤️💛💚

🦁 🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁🦁

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Marley

 

“One Love Video”

 

“Buffalo Soldier – Bob Marley & The Wailers”

 

 

 

“Redemption Song Video”

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✨🇯🇲🎶JAMAICA – Does Me Proud! ~ Jamaica’s Reggae Protected by U.N. | Recognised Cultural Treasure by UNESCO | Listed World Heritage🎶🇯🇲✨

“I did a blog post a few days ago, expressing the disappointment I had in the country of my parents birth, due to the reoccurring violence. However, when one does good? They should also be praised. So with that, I share this post. Proud ah yuh JAMAICAAAAA!!!”

 

Published on Nov 29, 2018

SUBSCRIBED 1.1K

Jamaica’s Culture Minister Olivia Grange speaking on in Mauritius on the addition of Reggae music to the United Nations’ list of global cultural treasures. UNESCO, the world body’s cultural and scientific agency, added the genre that originated in Jamaica to its collection of “intangible cultural heritage” deemed worthy of protection and promotion. Official Statement from UNESCO Having originated within a cultural space that was home to marginalized groups, mainly in Western Kingston, the Reggae music of Jamaica is an amalgam of numerous musical influences, including earlier Jamaican forms as well as the Caribbean, North American and Latin strains. In time, Neo-African styles, soul and rhythm, and blues from North America were incorporated into the element, gradually transforming Ska into Rock Steady and then into Reggae. While in its embryonic state Reggae music was the voice of the marginalized, the music is now played and embraced by a wide cross-section of society, including various genders, ethnic and religious groups. Its contribution to the international discourse on issues of injustice, resistance, love, and humanity underscores the dynamics of the element as being at once cerebral, socio-political, sensual and spiritual. The basic social functions of the music – as a vehicle for social commentary, a cathartic practice, and a means of praising God – have not changed, and the music continues to act as a voice for all. Students are taught how to play the music in schools from early childhood to the tertiary level, and Reggae festivals and concerts such as Reggae Sumfest and Reggae Salute provide annual outlets, as well as an opportunity for understudy and transmission for upcoming artists, musicians, and other practitioners. Video courtesy of Clifton “Specialist” Dillon
 Lloyd Brown (Twitter & YouTube) asked an interesting question, 
“What does Reggae Music need protection from?”
Good question…